Category Archives: Today’s News

Veterinarian position available – ACCOMMODATION INCLUDED!

Sitting in peak hour traffic trying to get to work on time? Eh, no thanks!
Daily sleep ins followed by a 20 second stroll to work? Yes please..

Paying $700+ per week for a shoe box in Sydney CBD? No thank you..
Accommodation provided in the picturesque, safe and welcoming heritage village of Hall? Hmm that’s very tempting..

A train, bus, ferry and cab to get to your favorite bar for dinner and drink? Its a no from me..
All the culture of Melbourne and Sydney combined but without the hassle? Okay, I’m sold.

Say hello to your new place!
Come and see what Canberra has to offer!

Why not take this incredible opportunity to see what all the Canberra fuss is about! Hall Veterinary Surgery and Vets at Amaroo are looking for a veterinarian to join our team.

Our modern and purpose built branch practice Vets at Amaroo

We are a Lincoln Institute Accredited Employer Of Choice – the highest level of leadership qualification currently available for Veterinary Professionals in Australia and New Zealand, and we want you!

About Us:

We are a small animal practice, operating out of two purpose-built clinics. With a mix of old heads and youthful vitality, each vet feels appreciated and worthwhile. We are supported by experienced qualified nurses and utilise a dedicated consult nurse. We work to everyone’s strengths and help each other to do our best every day.

We embrace autonomy, mastery and purpose so you will get lead the pet’s health journey and drive your own learning journey underpinned with an underlying deep seated caring orientated purpose. We are one big family without the Christmas arguments and through our love of learning, teamwork, respect and trust we deliver the best care to the pets and their people in a fun environment.

About you:

If you are a good listener, empathetic, love talking to people and helping clients give their pets the best possible life then this is the place for you. If you embrace challenges and love working in a team then we want you. If you are keen to grow in a supportive environment then we will help you become the best version of yourself. What are you waiting for?

What else:

  • Above award salary
  • Package negotiable, including a minimum of 4 weeks annual leave, study allowance and study leave. Pro rata for part time
  • Weekly rostered day off for full time
  • Provided continued education
  • ACT Vet Boars registration paid for
  • ACT Radiation license paid for

What’s next:

Whether you are an experienced vet or perhaps a new graduate just starting out, give us a call, we’d love to chat.
Telephone contact: Janet (Practice Manager) 6230 2223
Email contact: office@hallvet.com.au

Outbreak Warning: Potentially fatal cat viruses in the Canberra area

Two viruses, one a new strain and the other a resurgence of an old virus are causing concerns for our feline friends and their owners around Canberra.

Virulent strain of cat flu (feline calicivirus)

In March this year and now again in June/July, vets around Canberra have seen sick cats suffering from a particularly virulent form of a cat flu virus, FCV-VSD (Feline calicivirus – virulent systemic disease)

While typical signs of flu in cats include mouth ulcers, sneezing and perhaps lameness, the virulent strain can cause a much more severe illness. Signs are usually more severe in adult cats than in kittens and fatalities are common. Whilst the normal flu vaccination may offer some protection, even fully vaccinated cats can succumb to the virulent strain.

Affected cats show some or all of the following signs – loss of appetite, lethargy, high fever, swollen limb(s) and/or head, jaundice, difficulty breathing, mouth ulcers and sores on the nose, ear tips and skin. These signs are similar to those reported in previous outbreaks in the US and Europe.

Fortunately, most infected cats in Canberra have recovered due to prompt diagnosis and supporting treatment.

The virus can survive in the environment for around one month. It is highly contagious and spreads easily to other cats via hands, clothing, shoes, bedding, food bowls and litter trays. The greatest risk of spread occurs in multi-cat environments such as shelters and boarding catteries. Fortunately spread in the wider community has been limited and the outbreaks seem to ‘burn out’.

Researchers at Sydney Uni are investigating the virulent strain and vets have been submitting mouth swabs from any suspect cases for testing.

If your cat is showing any of the signs listed above, please call us on 62302223 to arrange an appointment. An initial assessment may be done in the car by a vet kitted out in gloves and disposable gown to minimise the risk of spreading the virus.

 

Feline enteritis

The resurgence of the deadly virus, FPV (feline panleukopenia virus) which was almost eradicated 40 years ago by vaccinations, has been confirmed in various locations throughout Australia, including Melbourne and Canberra.

FPV is highly contagious and can be fatal to the affected cat.

The most common form of FPV presents as a three to four day history of high temperature, lethargy, loss of appetite and may progress to vomiting and diarrhoea. However, in cases of very severe infection, cats can die very suddenly with no apparent signs.

FPV in cats is caused by parvoviruses, which are small DNA viruses. The main one is feline panleukopenia virus but parvoviruses that infect dogs can also cause the disease in cats.

Disease control relies on strong herd immunity and that can only be achieved by keeping pets up-to-date with their vaccinations.

We recommend that kittens are vaccinated starting from 6-8 weeks of age and then every 4 weeks until they are 16 weeks old.

Cats receiving their first vaccination after 16 weeks of age only need one dose with a booster at 6-12 months and then every three years thereafter.

The modified live F3 vaccine used at Hall Veterinary surgery provides highly effective protection against this virus.

PLEASE NOTE:
Strict disinfection procedures have been implemented at the surgery so please do not be offended if we ask you to leave your cat in the car and phone us when you arrive for your appointment, we have your cat’s health as our top priority.

Holidays

Hall Veterinary Surgery will be closed on the two upcoming ACT public holidays.

Family & Community Day Monday, 25 September 2017
Labour Day Monday, 2 October 2017

We’ll reopen with normal business hours on each of the following Tuesdays. Enjoy your holiday time with your pet!

Rabbit owners – new calicivirus strain requires vaccination every 6 months

We now have Calicivirus Vaccine back in stock, please call us on 6230 2223 to make an appointment.
A young girl is holding a rabbit in her hands.
Warning for all rabbit owners: To control wild rabbit populations a new strain of Calicivirus has been released.
In order to protect pet rabbits from this virus, the Department of Primary Industries is recommending that pet rabbits are now vaccinated EVERY 6 MONTHS with Cylap® Calicivirus vaccine. The Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) state that this vaccine has not been tested against the new strain of Calicivirus but have suggested this more intensive – but off-label – use of the existing vaccine be used. This protocol can be discussed with your vet.

Pet rabbits that have not been previously vaccinated should receive two vaccinations, one month apart, and then every 6 months for life. Newborn rabbits should be vaccinated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks old, and then every 6 months for life.

Until this latest Calicivirus release, the vaccination schedule was to vaccinate your rabbit every 12 months – this has now changed to six months. Please call reception at Hall Veterinary Surgery on 6230 2223 to check your pet rabbit’s vaccination status.
In addition to altering the vaccination from yearly to twice yearly, ensure your pet rabbit has NO contact with wild rabbits;
  • avoid feeding from potentially contaminated grass;
  • wash your hands between handling rabbits and
  • maintain good insect control for your pet rabbit.
More information available at: http://www.ava.com.au/rabbit-calicivirus

Increase in Mosquito activity leads to Heartworm Warning for Dogs

The dramatic rise in mosquito numbers means pet owners need to be vigilant with their dog’s heartworm treatment. 

Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is spread by a mosquito biting an infected dog (or ferret or fox) and ingests the heartworm larvae.

The next step is the mosquito buzzing off and biting another dog and infecting them with the heartworm larvae.

Without preventative products on board, the larvae continue to develop, eventually reaching the heart and lungs where the adult worms can strangle the heart and congest the lungs.

Year round treatment is required for all pet dogs.

If you are unsure when your dog last had a heartworm treatment please call Hall Veterinary Surgery on 6230 2223.

Where heart worm prevention has been intermittent or lapsed, our vets will restart prevention and advise a blood test to ensure your pet is still heartworm free.

Cat Names (2013)

Jasmine1Here’s what our clients have been naming their cats for the last three years.

Male Cats:

  1. Max
  2. Leo
  3. Charlie, Felix, & Zac
  4. Benji, Darcy, Harry, Jasper, Memphis, Oscar, Pepper, Puss, Sheldon, Simba, Thomas & Wally

Female Cats:

  1. Coco
  2. Molly
  3. Milly, Pepper, Ruby, Zoe
  4. Lilly, Lucy, Luna

Some admirable names for the more unique cats:

For the boys, Ambassador Spock, Apollo, Banjo, Donald Duck, LIttle Al, Noddy, Stinky (!?) and Toulouse, and amongst the girls, Atilla, Bb, Clawdia, Dog (?!), Laxmi, Shredder and Xena.

You can compare this with a similar list from 2012.

Heat stroke

(We published this back in 2011, but with the coming very hot days at the end of the week, we thought it best to mention again…)

Death from heat stroke is common in dogs in hot weather, especially if it is humid as well. Every summer we see dogs that overdo it in the heat.  When heat generation exceeds heat dissipation, body temperature goes up to dangerous levels.

Some animals are more likely to develop heatstroke than others. Working dogs who don’t know when to stop or who are not allowed to cool off in a trough or under a tree overheat rapidly on a hot day.

Flat-faced dogs with breathing difficulties, like pugs, boxers and Staffordshire bull terriers, cannot lose heat as quickly as they generate it in hot weather. No matter how much they pant, their temperature continues to go up.

Sometimes obese or overweight dogs over-reach their fitness levels and collapse in hot and humid weather.

Dogs or cats confined in poorly ventilated areas without water and shade on a hot day risk developing heatstroke, also.

Early signs of heat stroke are high body temperatures, often over 40 degrees centigrade, excessive panting and rapid heart rate. Many dogs vomit and develop diarrhoea, often with blood in it. They soon collapse, bleed and fit. The gums are dark and red but towards the end become pale and ashen.

Heat stroke is an emergency. Wet your dog to the skin to start getting the temperature down and phone your vet. Most dogs require treatment with a drip and drugs to prevent shock.

Prevent heat stroke by making sure your dog has plenty of water and shade at all times.

Avoid mustering or running on hot days. Early morning or late evening is safer for stock and dogs.

Flat-face and overweight dogs should never exercise in the heat of the day. Know your pets’ limits of fitness and retreat into the cool before they reach them and overheat.

 

 

CANBERRA CAT VET IS OPEN!

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Canberra Cat Vet, Hall Vet Surgery’s feline offshoot, is open. Phone Leanne or Dr Kate on 6251 1444 for an appointment for consultations, check-ups, vaccinations, dental treatments, desexing or any other cat-related matter.

Come in and have a look around our brand new facility at 16-18 Purdue St Belconnen. Drive in from Gillott St and park right next to our front door. We are near the Post Office, below the bus depot and Officeworks, behind the old police station and in the same building as Belconnen Physiotherapy.

We have a gift for our first 50 visitors (and their cats!)

Where is Canberra Cat Vet?

Hall Vet Surgery’s Canberra Cat Vet opens on 12th August. It is located near Belconnen Westfield Plaza, behind the old Police Station and below the Belconnen bus depot, between Gillott and  Purdue Streets. Drive in from Gillott St and park near our front door. Look forward to seeing you and your cat there soon!

Where are we 2

Parvo epidemic

Little sad dog. Used under license from iStockphoto.comCanberra is in the middle of a nasty parvovirus epidemic. If your dog is less than 1 year old please check that he or she has had 3 puppy vaccinations, with the final one at 14 weeks of age or older.

Older dogs should have had a distemper, hepatitis and parvovirus booster at 15 months of age and then one every 3 years.
Please call us if you have any doubts about your dog’s vaccination status.

Parvovirus causes vomiting and diarrhoea. Often the diarrhoea is bloody. Infected dogs feel really sick and usually need a drip to keep them hydrated and antibiotics to prevent infections from escaping the bowel and entering the body.