All posts by KK

Heat stroke

(We published this back in 2011, but with the coming very hot days at the end of the week, we thought it best to mention again…)

Death from heat stroke is common in dogs in hot weather, especially if it is humid as well. Every summer we see dogs that overdo it in the heat.  When heat generation exceeds heat dissipation, body temperature goes up to dangerous levels.

Some animals are more likely to develop heatstroke than others. Working dogs who don’t know when to stop or who are not allowed to cool off in a trough or under a tree overheat rapidly on a hot day.

Flat-faced dogs with breathing difficulties, like pugs, boxers and Staffordshire bull terriers, cannot lose heat as quickly as they generate it in hot weather. No matter how much they pant, their temperature continues to go up.

Sometimes obese or overweight dogs over-reach their fitness levels and collapse in hot and humid weather.

Dogs or cats confined in poorly ventilated areas without water and shade on a hot day risk developing heatstroke, also.

Early signs of heat stroke are high body temperatures, often over 40 degrees centigrade, excessive panting and rapid heart rate. Many dogs vomit and develop diarrhoea, often with blood in it. They soon collapse, bleed and fit. The gums are dark and red but towards the end become pale and ashen.

Heat stroke is an emergency. Wet your dog to the skin to start getting the temperature down and phone your vet. Most dogs require treatment with a drip and drugs to prevent shock.

Prevent heat stroke by making sure your dog has plenty of water and shade at all times.

Avoid mustering or running on hot days. Early morning or late evening is safer for stock and dogs.

Flat-face and overweight dogs should never exercise in the heat of the day. Know your pets’ limits of fitness and retreat into the cool before they reach them and overheat.

 

 

CANBERRA CAT VET IS OPEN!

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Canberra Cat Vet, Hall Vet Surgery’s feline offshoot, is open. Phone Leanne or Dr Kate on 6251 1444 for an appointment for consultations, check-ups, vaccinations, dental treatments, desexing or any other cat-related matter.

Come in and have a look around our brand new facility at 16-18 Purdue St Belconnen. Drive in from Gillott St and park right next to our front door. We are near the Post Office, below the bus depot and Officeworks, behind the old police station and in the same building as Belconnen Physiotherapy.

We have a gift for our first 50 visitors (and their cats!)

Where is Canberra Cat Vet?

Hall Vet Surgery’s Canberra Cat Vet opens on 12th August. It is located near Belconnen Westfield Plaza, behind the old Police Station and below the Belconnen bus depot, between Gillott and  Purdue Streets. Drive in from Gillott St and park near our front door. Look forward to seeing you and your cat there soon!

Where are we 2

Parvo epidemic

Little sad dog. Used under license from iStockphoto.comCanberra is in the middle of a nasty parvovirus epidemic. If your dog is less than 1 year old please check that he or she has had 3 puppy vaccinations, with the final one at 14 weeks of age or older.

Older dogs should have had a distemper, hepatitis and parvovirus booster at 15 months of age and then one every 3 years.
Please call us if you have any doubts about your dog’s vaccination status.

Parvovirus causes vomiting and diarrhoea. Often the diarrhoea is bloody. Infected dogs feel really sick and usually need a drip to keep them hydrated and antibiotics to prevent infections from escaping the bowel and entering the body.

Are your pets disaster ready?

 

Used under licence from iStockPhoto.com

The 10th anniversary of the fires that devastated many parts of the ACT in January, 2003, reminds us that we should always be prepared for the unpredictable. Storms, fires and floods can come at any time and affect pets as well as people. Many pets were lost in the fires of 2003. Some were injured or died, others never found their owners and were re-homed or euthanased.

Make sure that your pets are microchipped and that your contact details on the ACT register are up to date. If you have time attach a tag with your mobile number and address, and your vet’s phone number to your pets’ collars so that if someone without access to a microchip scanner picks them up you can be contacted.

Have an emergency kit packed in advance. Include non-perishable food like dry dog kibble, water in spill proof containers, collars, leads, harnesses, cat carrier, litter tray, blankets and treats as well as a first aid kit. The first aid kit should have gauze swabs, bandages, disinfectant, cotton wool, scissors and the appropriate size muzzles for your dogs. Even the most placid animal may react unpredictably when in pain.

Decide where your pets will go if you have to evacuate. You may have family or friends outside the danger zone who would look after them. Kennels or shelters may be available in an emergency.

If you leave your pets at home leave them in the safest enclosed room in the house, usually the bathroom, with food and water. Don’t ever tie animals up as they will injure themselves trying to escape. Leave a notice on the gate or door of the house with your contact details and saying that there are pets inside.

 

Free Dental check

Bring your pet in during August for a free dental check and advice on keeping your pet’s teeth clean and healthy. The vets are already busy checking pets’ mouths. Some pets have had a scale and polish to give them a fresh start. Find out the most effective way to keep your pet’s teeth sparkling and gums healthy with a good diet and lots of chewing.

Phone us on 6230 2223 to make an appointment for your pet’s free check.

Senior health screening program

Have you booked your older pet for a senior screen yet? Coco has been reading about the advantages of 6-12 monthly checks for pets over 10 years of age and is worried that some of her friends might miss out on the Hills senior screening program.

Hills are offering a $20 discount on the cost of a check up and any tests that have to be done. Just go to Hills senior screening to print your voucher out. Book a check up with us and bring the voucher with you.

(No worries if you haven’t got access to a printer – just ask our receptionist to print a voucher out for you)