Category Archives: Today’s News

Holidays

Hall Veterinary Surgery will be closed on the two upcoming ACT public holidays.

Family & Community Day Monday, 25 September 2017
Labour Day Monday, 2 October 2017

We’ll reopen with normal business hours on each of the following Tuesdays. Enjoy your holiday time with your pet!

Rabbit owners – new calicivirus strain requires vaccination every 6 months

We now have Calicivirus Vaccine back in stock, please call us on 6230 2223 to make an appointment.
A young girl is holding a rabbit in her hands.
Warning for all rabbit owners: To control wild rabbit populations a new strain of Calicivirus has been released.
In order to protect pet rabbits from this virus, the Department of Primary Industries is recommending that pet rabbits are now vaccinated EVERY 6 MONTHS with Cylap® Calicivirus vaccine. The Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) state that this vaccine has not been tested against the new strain of Calicivirus but have suggested this more intensive – but off-label – use of the existing vaccine be used. This protocol can be discussed with your vet.

Pet rabbits that have not been previously vaccinated should receive two vaccinations, one month apart, and then every 6 months for life. Newborn rabbits should be vaccinated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks old, and then every 6 months for life.

Until this latest Calicivirus release, the vaccination schedule was to vaccinate your rabbit every 12 months – this has now changed to six months. Please call reception at Hall Veterinary Surgery on 6230 2223 to check your pet rabbit’s vaccination status.
In addition to altering the vaccination from yearly to twice yearly, ensure your pet rabbit has NO contact with wild rabbits;
  • avoid feeding from potentially contaminated grass;
  • wash your hands between handling rabbits and
  • maintain good insect control for your pet rabbit.
More information available at: http://www.ava.com.au/rabbit-calicivirus

Increase in Mosquito activity leads to Heartworm Warning for Dogs

The dramatic rise in mosquito numbers means pet owners need to be vigilant with their dog’s heartworm treatment. 

Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is spread by a mosquito biting an infected dog (or ferret or fox) and ingests the heartworm larvae.

The next step is the mosquito buzzing off and biting another dog and infecting them with the heartworm larvae.

Without preventative products on board, the larvae continue to develop, eventually reaching the heart and lungs where the adult worms can strangle the heart and congest the lungs.

Year round treatment is required for all pet dogs.

If you are unsure when your dog last had a heartworm treatment please call Hall Veterinary Surgery on 6230 2223.

Where heart worm prevention has been intermittent or lapsed, our vets will restart prevention and advise a blood test to ensure your pet is still heartworm free.

Christmas Trading Times

All of us at Hall Veterinary Surgery wish you and your pets a safe and happy Festive Season. Watch out for snakes, heat exhaustion and eating the wrong food!

We are only closed on the Public Holidays, so our schedule is:

Fri 23 Dec 8.30am – 6.30pm
Sat 24 Dec 8.30am – 2.30pm
Sun 25 Dec Closed!
Mon 26 Dec Closed. Boxing Day
Tue 27 Dec Closed. Christmas Day Public Holiday
Wed 28 Dec 8.30am – 6.30pm
Thu 29 Dec 8.30am – 6.30pm
Fri 31 Dec 8.30am – 6.30pm
Sat 31 Dec 8.30am – 6.30pm
Sun 1 Jan 2017 Closed.
Mon 2 Jan Closed. New Years Day
Tue 3 Jan
Normal hours resume
8.30am – 6.30pm

 

Cat Names (2013)

Jasmine1Here’s what our clients have been naming their cats for the last three years.

Male Cats:

  1. Max
  2. Leo
  3. Charlie, Felix, & Zac
  4. Benji, Darcy, Harry, Jasper, Memphis, Oscar, Pepper, Puss, Sheldon, Simba, Thomas & Wally

Female Cats:

  1. Coco
  2. Molly
  3. Milly, Pepper, Ruby, Zoe
  4. Lilly, Lucy, Luna

Some admirable names for the more unique cats:

For the boys, Ambassador Spock, Apollo, Banjo, Donald Duck, LIttle Al, Noddy, Stinky (!?) and Toulouse, and amongst the girls, Atilla, Bb, Clawdia, Dog (?!), Laxmi, Shredder and Xena.

You can compare this with a similar list from 2012.

Heat stroke

(We published this back in 2011, but with the coming very hot days at the end of the week, we thought it best to mention again…)

Death from heat stroke is common in dogs in hot weather, especially if it is humid as well. Every summer we see dogs that overdo it in the heat.  When heat generation exceeds heat dissipation, body temperature goes up to dangerous levels.

Some animals are more likely to develop heatstroke than others. Working dogs who don’t know when to stop or who are not allowed to cool off in a trough or under a tree overheat rapidly on a hot day.

Flat-faced dogs with breathing difficulties, like pugs, boxers and Staffordshire bull terriers, cannot lose heat as quickly as they generate it in hot weather. No matter how much they pant, their temperature continues to go up.

Sometimes obese or overweight dogs over-reach their fitness levels and collapse in hot and humid weather.

Dogs or cats confined in poorly ventilated areas without water and shade on a hot day risk developing heatstroke, also.

Early signs of heat stroke are high body temperatures, often over 40 degrees centigrade, excessive panting and rapid heart rate. Many dogs vomit and develop diarrhoea, often with blood in it. They soon collapse, bleed and fit. The gums are dark and red but towards the end become pale and ashen.

Heat stroke is an emergency. Wet your dog to the skin to start getting the temperature down and phone your vet. Most dogs require treatment with a drip and drugs to prevent shock.

Prevent heat stroke by making sure your dog has plenty of water and shade at all times.

Avoid mustering or running on hot days. Early morning or late evening is safer for stock and dogs.

Flat-face and overweight dogs should never exercise in the heat of the day. Know your pets’ limits of fitness and retreat into the cool before they reach them and overheat.

 

 

CANBERRA CAT VET IS OPEN!

Print

 

Canberra Cat Vet, Hall Vet Surgery’s feline offshoot, is open. Phone Leanne or Dr Kate on 6251 1444 for an appointment for consultations, check-ups, vaccinations, dental treatments, desexing or any other cat-related matter.

Come in and have a look around our brand new facility at 16-18 Purdue St Belconnen. Drive in from Gillott St and park right next to our front door. We are near the Post Office, below the bus depot and Officeworks, behind the old police station and in the same building as Belconnen Physiotherapy.

We have a gift for our first 50 visitors (and their cats!)

Where is Canberra Cat Vet?

Hall Vet Surgery’s Canberra Cat Vet opens on 12th August. It is located near Belconnen Westfield Plaza, behind the old Police Station and below the Belconnen bus depot, between Gillott and  Purdue Streets. Drive in from Gillott St and park near our front door. Look forward to seeing you and your cat there soon!

Where are we 2